You Get What You Pay For? We say YES

STANDARD H WATCH A. LANGE AND SOHNE.png

Below, you'll find a video that does a fantastic job explaining the differences between what you get for each respective price point in the world of watches.  It's definitely intriguing to know the level of detail is truly unsurpassed as one's spending potential climbs. The three brand explored are NOMOS, Jaeger-LeCoultre, and A. Lange & Söhne.   enJOY:

The Car and Watch "Thing" Explained...

Image: HODINKEE

Image: HODINKEE

Recently, HODINKEE posted an interview with A. Lange & Söhne CEO, Wilhelm Schmid, from the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este which I found to represent and explain some of the sentiments behind cars, watches, and the mental and emotional attachments we collectors share. At times, I find it difficult to describe the "why" we do what we do to those who don't share these passions, or even understand collecting anything, for that matter.  Rather than copy and past the article, I figured I'd go the old SEO route and link to the interview instead.  enJOY:

https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/a-lange-sohne-ceo-wilhelm-schmid-concorso-2018-interview

Focus

Through experience, you'll know that when you're interested in something, it's very easy to focus. Take watching a movie you like, for instance: you don't have to think about paying attention, you just watch it, right? When I heard this via Headspace, it was like a premonition. If you're not focusing, perhaps you've lost interest?

Being distracted these days is relentlessly easy, but I sort of feel like if you're being distracted THAT easily, then perhaps you've lost interest. Does this happen to you? I'm sure it does, whether it be in your business or in your personal relationships. Regardless, this post is nothing more than to remind you to keep your eye on the prize, whatever/whomever that prize may be. 

Meditation

During the start of something new: relationships, a new year, a new business, etc., we are able to identify how they make us feel: happy, or excited. However, when we acknowledge our emotions, we primarily do so when they begin, but we rarely acknowledge the end of certain emotions. 

For example: In tough times, we make ourselves aware of when times are tough, but we don't acknowledge the moments and feelings we feel when things get better. Business is very tough at times, and cause and effect would be an understatement of a characterization. We all induce change at some point (again, be it in business, or in our personal lives), and an important component of change exists when we acknowledge all of these states of emotions, whether we're coming into or out of tough times. Take note of the end of your feelings and not just the beginning of them. 

(This message brought as an unpaid expert from Headspace.)

30 Minutes With....Michael DiTullo

Michael DiTullo Designer

The latest edition of 30 Minutes With... is a bit different as our next subject, Michael DiTullo, graciously invited us into his home, as well!

Name: Michael DiTullo

Occupation: Product Designer

Home: Leucadia, California

First Car: 1987 2-Door Buick Sommerset Regal in Black which he bought from his grandfather for $1.00 

Vehicle Featured: 2015 Audi S3 Quattro. 2.0 liter turbo. 280 horsepower. S tronic DSG transmission. 2013 19" RS4 wheels.

Additional Car: 2001 Audi TT Convertible. 225 horsepower 6-speed manual transmission.  

Cars of Note: 2001 Toyota MR2, 2012 Audi S5

Dream Car: Aston Martin DB4 Zagato

Jon Olsson's 800hp+ Lamborghini Huracan

Jon Olsson made his name known by winning Freestyle Skiing gold medals in the Winter X Games throughout the majority of the beginning of this millennium. After making a switch over to downhill ski racing, he started a daily vlog on YouTube, which leads us to the below video.

You read the title of this blog correctly, and what you'll see below is borderline beyond comprehension.  OUtfitted with a supercharged engine and an Akrapovic exhaust, Olsson itches, scratches and screams through the mountainside streets of Monaco.  Like his passenger, this kind of car can only bring smiles to your face, I'm sure.  Check it out:

Interview: Cameron Weiss, Owner Weiss Watch Company

Many of you watch fans, especially those of you in the greater Los Angeles area, may be familiar with Weiss Watch Company.  Founded in Los Angeles by watchmaker Cameron Weiss, the Torrance, California-based company has a growing distribution across the city and beyond with solid positioning in shops such as Barneys New York, Wittmore and Stag Provisions on Abbot Kinney.

Recently, we exchanged a couple emails for the below interview. It's short, but it's sweet, and it's always great to receive insight straight from the horse's mouth.  enJOY

 

Cameron, I'd like to start by asking a bit about your background: where were you born & raised, and where in Los Angeles are you currently based?

I was born in San Diego (Del Mar), and now I live in Redondo Beach.  

 

What were the reasons you decided to start making your own watches?

My goal as I searched how and where I could learn watchmaking was always to start my own watch brand. It was just a journey to get here. I was very interested in classical, mechanical items and wanted to build my brand in America.

 

For those who don't know, with regards to the components you use, what is manufactured in-house and what is manufactured elsewhere?

We manufacture cases, crowns, buckles, straps, dials, and many of the movement components.

 

What distinguishes your movements from other manufacturers from a mechanical/function standpoint?
 

What distinguishes our movements is that it was designed to be a workhorse in serial production.

 

Can you walk us through some of the distinctions between your watches?  What is the main difference between the Weiss Standard Issue Field Watch ($950) and the American Issue Field Watch ($2,500)? Can you explain some of the reasons for the price difference? 

Our Standard Issue Field Watch is our flagship edition and our entry level offering. It is hand-finished and assembled with a Swiss movement and American parts in our studio. 

Our American Issue Field Watch is mostly machined within our Los Angeles studio, has gold finishing, and comes on a Shell Cordovan strap. In addition, there were only 50 timepieces available, making it our most rare offering. Our pricing changes throughout our offerings due to the model, design, movement, and amount produced.

 

 

Aside from the military, where else do you draw inspiration (outside of the watch industry)?

I draw inspiration from vintage pocket watches, aviation, old Hollywood icons, and classic menswear.
 

Smaller brands have traditionally produced very few watches, annually. F.P. Journe, for example, produces around 850 watches per year. As a small business - how many watches would you say will be produced this year? 

Since I produce each timepiece myself, we have a limited offering. We will produce 1500 -2000 this year and are currently expanding our production capabilities.

 

For anyone looking to start their own business, regardless of industry, what advice would you give them? 

Take risks, and if it's something you truly believe in and are passionate about, then you will be successful.
 

What's next for you? Are there plans for watches with more complications (i.e. chronograph, moon phase) involved in the future, or are you wanting to focus solely on time-only time pieces?

We just launched our new Automatic Issue, our first self-winding timepiece, this week. We are proud to offer a new classic style and produce the oscillating weight ourselves in our studio all for an attainable price. 

I am trained in advanced complications, so while I envision Weiss as a utilitarian brand, I'll never say never.

 

What is Weiss Watch Company's ultimate goal?

Our ultimate goal is to produce a trusted everyday heirloom at an attainable price with as many components produced within our studio as possible.

 

Thank you so much for taking the time, Cameron.  We wish you further success and will undoubtedly enjoy witnessing your progress!  

 

 

Weiss has had some fantastic press as of late.  Check out the following links for more information:

The Wall Street Journal

Barneys

Watch Journal